How Psychedelic Surf Smugglers Invented Dabs (With Help From the CIA?)

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Who invented the dab?

All too often in the world of cannabis such monumental achievements end up lost to history, particularly those that date back to the bad old days of total prohibition. But in this case, we actually have a primary document to work off. Because on October 3, 1973, the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary held a rather unique hearing entitled Hashish Smuggling and Passport Control: The Brotherhood of Eternal Love.

We tend to think of dabs (a highly concentrated cannabis extract) as a fairly recent phenomenon, but as the hearing’s official transcript makes clear, the production and consumption of this product actually dates back at least to the early 1970s.

This particular airing of government grievances came at the end of a massive law enforcement campaign against The Brotherhood—a legendary network of cannabis smugglers and LSD evangelists that flooded the country with acid and hashish back in the late 60s and early 70s, before a wave of arrests and indictments took them down.

In the following exchange, J. G. Sourwine—chief counsel for the Senate Subcommittee on the Judiciary—is asking a couple of DEA agents to tell him the origin story of a highly concentrated cannabis extraction that The Brotherhood of Eternal Love dubbed “honey oil” and the cops called “hashish oil.”

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CBD For Anxiety, Does It Work?

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According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders are the most common mental complications in the United States affecting more than 40 million adults in the US or at least 18% of the population every year. Although anxiety disorders are highly treatable, only about 36% of anxiety patients receive treatment.

Several factors can lead to anxiety. Some of these factors include brain chemistry, genetics, personality, and drastic life changes. We are all, therefore, prone to anxiety.

Anxiety affects us differently. Some people might feel unprepared, unsure, or nervous when trying something new or before giving a speech. These feelings may manifest in physical symptoms such as headaches, shortness of breath, or clammy hands.

Anxiety is actually an adaptive response that can help us cope with challenges or day to day threats. These responses can help identify and avert potential threats, encourage us to work harder, etc. However, when we don’t respond well to these triggers, they can become maladaptive leading to clinical anxiety disorders.

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First Clinical Trial Of Cannabis For PTSD in Veterans Is Now Complete

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After a decade of working on the first FDA-approved trial examining the effects of THC and CBD on the symptoms of PTSD in war veterans, a team of researchers has declared their clinical trial complete. The process, however, was not simple.

“We are proud to have persevered through these regulatory hurdles independently of hospitals, universities, or the VA system,” commented site principal investigator Dr. Sue Sisley in a press release.

The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) received approval from the U.S. Public Health Service to start the study back in 2014. Research began in January 2017 at Phoenix, Arizona’s Scottsdale Research Institute, and was slated to also take place at Johns Hopkins University, until the school dropped out of the experiment in March 2017.

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S.420 Bill For Dummies

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A new bill introduced in the Senate would legalize marijuana, and it’s not just the text of the bill that’s a nod to marijuana culture. The bill, introduced by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), is labeled with a conspicuous number: S.420.

See the full version of the bill – CLICK HERE

The new bill would give the Drug Enforcement Administration 60 days to remove the drug from its list of controlled substances, while also barring the sale of marijuana in states where it’s still illegal. S.420 would also require merchants to add an excise tax to marijuana, an indirect tax that’s added to the price of the product, similar to how tobacco and alcohol are taxed.

The bill would also require businesses to register for special permits to start selling weed. Cannabis products would also face labeling and advertising requirements similar to those required for alcohol.

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FACTS vs. FICTION: Is Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS) Caused by Neem Oil?

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Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is a relatively rare condition in which a cannabis user may suddenly, or repeatedly, suffer from long, painful episodes of intractable vomiting and intense nausea that can last for hours, or even days at a time.

CHS is more prevalent in experienced and heavy cannabis users, though there have been anecdotal cases of new users suffering from similar symptoms.

This range of victims, combined with the fact that these cases did not enter medical literature until about a decade ago, led many cannabis users to question the validity of the condition even when suffering from the symptoms themselves.

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Does the 2018 Farm Bill Legalize CBD in all 50 States or Not?

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After the U.S. House and Senate easily passed the $867 billion 2018 Farm Bill, headlines began cropping up immediately about the language within that officially ends decades of senseless prohibition of the hemp plant.

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Hemp Fields Offer a Late-Season Pollen Source for Stressed Bees

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Industrial hemp plants, the no-high varieties of cannabis, are becoming a more familiar sight for American bees as states create pilot programs for legal growing. Neither hemp nor the other strains of the Cannabis sativa species grown for recreational or medicinal uses offer insects any nectar, and all rely on wind to spread pollen. Still, a wide variety of bees showed up in two experimental hemp plots during a one-month trapping survey by entomology student Colton O’Brien of Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

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