Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy hosts the second annual Texas Marijuana Policy Conference!

texas logo

Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy hosts the second annual Texas Marijuana Policy Conference!

Sheraton Austin at the Capitol

August 30-September 1, 2019

Historic progress was made during this year’s legislative session. Our state legalized hemp production and expanded access to the Compassionate Use Program, creating tremendous opportunity for both consumers and entrepreneurs. Sadly, though, most patients are still being left behind and lawmakers failed to reduce penalties for low-level marijuana possession. There is still a lot of work to do in Texas!

Our three-day conference will offer presentations from policy and industry leaders to help attendees better understand and navigate the new legal climate. We will also be focused on opportunities and our path forward to ensure more meaningful policy changes when the legislature meets again in 2021.

In addition to policy and advocacy discussions surrounding decriminalization, medical cannabis, and hemp, we’ll feature a track of cannabis business sessions geared toward entrepreneurs, market watchdogs, and investors. We’ll also offer accredited continuing legal and medical education for attorneys and medical professionals.

Register now for early bird pricing and share the event with your friends and colleagues who are interested in this exciting movement! Rates go up on August 1st.

image10

Register Now

Early bird prices are available until August 1st, including our All Access Pass, which gets you into all conference events! Register now!

 

image11

Sheraton at the Capitol

Reserve your hotel room now to lock in our discounted rate.

Click here to reserve your room.

Gov. Greg Abbott signs law legalizing hemp production, CBD products in Texas

 

6-19-18-hemp

Gov. Greg Abbott signed a new law Monday that clears up which CBD products are legal in Texas and will also allow local farmers to grow hemp as a crop.

The law, which received bipartisan support in the state Legislature, goes into effect immediately.

It will allow Texas to set up a federally approved program for farmers to grow hemp as an industrial crop, including procedures for sampling, inspection and testing. It also expands the kind of hemp products that can be legally purchased in Texas to include any hemp or hemp-derived products containing less than 0.3 percent of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive compound found in cannabis plants.

This includes cannabidiol, or CBD, products. While Texans have found oils, tinctures and other CBD goods on store shelves for years, those that contained even trace amounts of THC were technically illegal here. Now, as long as these products are derived from hemp, contain less than 0.3 percent THC and meet other labeling and quality standards, they are legal.

Continue reading “Gov. Greg Abbott signs law legalizing hemp production, CBD products in Texas”

Texas expansion of medical cannabis nears finish line after Senate approval

texasflagmarijuana

The 86th Legislature runs from Jan. 8 to May 27. From the state budget to health care to education policy — and the politics behind it all — we focus on what Texans need to know about the biennial legislative session.

Marijuana advocates were handed an unlikely victory Wednesday after the Texas Senate advanced a bill greatly expanding the list of debilitating medical conditions that can legally be treated by cannabis oil in the state.

Although the upper chamber’s leadership once opposed bills that would relax the state’s pot policies, the Senate unanimously voted in favor of a bill by state Rep. Stephanie Klick, R-Fort Worth, that expands the state’s Compassionate Use Program, which currently allows the sale of cannabis oil only to people with intractable epilepsy who meet certain requirements.

The bill now heads back to the Texas House, where lawmakers can either approve the Senate changes or opt to iron out their differences in a conference committee before lawmakers adjourn in five days. Klick did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether she’d accept the Senate changes to her bill.

Continue reading “Texas expansion of medical cannabis nears finish line after Senate approval”

Medical cannabis bill clears Texas Senate committee

medical plants

The use of cannabis to treat a variety of debilitating medical conditions cleared a major hurdle Thursday when a legislative panel approved what supporters call the Compassionate Use Program.

The action by the Texas Senate Health and Human Services Committee could move House Bill 3703 to the full chamber for a vote next week.

“The Texas Legislature took another step toward a more inclusive and functional Compassionate Use Program,” said Heather Fazio, director of the Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy. “Sadly, though, the vast majority of patients are being left behind. We hope senators will consider including patients with other debilitating medical conditions like PTSD, severe pain, and Crohn’s Disease.”

The bill, which already has passed in the House, does not affect overall marijuana laws in Texas.

However, it does expand the medical use of cannabis to treat medical conditions including all epilepsy and seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, spasticity, terminal cancer, and incurable neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, autism and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sometimes called Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Several marijuana bills, however, remained bottled up.

The House has passed a measure by El Paso Democrat to effectively decriminalize first-time possession of an ounce or less of marijuana. But House Bill 63 is a nonstater in the Senate where Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, the presiding officer, has said he opposes any relaxation of drug laws.

Time for considering legislation is short. The session in Austin ends May 27.

Texas Senate Unanimously Approves Hemp Legalization Bill

Photo by Brendan Cleak 2017

Wednesday at the Texas Capitol was hump day — or hemp day, state Sen. Charles Perry joked before the upper chamber unanimously approved a bill that would legalize the farming of industrial hemp in Texas.

After a relatively short, amiable debate, the Texas Senate approved House Bill 1325 by state Rep. Tracy King. The bill would legalize hemp and hemp-derived extracts like CBD oil as long as they contain no more than 0.3% of tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive element in marijuana known as THC. While hemp-based products that contain no THC — like clothing and twine, protein powder, moisturizers and essential oils — are legal in the state, the plant cannot be legally grown here and Texas businesses often have to source it from other states or even countries.

Continue reading “Texas Senate Unanimously Approves Hemp Legalization Bill”

Texas loosens state-level hemp ban, but uncertainty remains

texas

Hemp holdout Texas is taking a big step toward embracing the federally legal plant, with one agency announcing a rule change to remove the plant from the state’s definition of marijuana.

But entrepreneurs hoping that Texas will allow a hemp industry before federal agencies take action say that the April 5 change isn’t enough to allow the booming industry to take root in the nation’s second-largest state.

The change was quietly announced earlier this month, when the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) added a notice to a state register that it would amend its definition of marijuana to carve out hemp with no more than 0.3% THC.

The agency said the change would align Texas’ definitions with the new federal standard adopted in the 2018 Farm Bill.

Hemp activists applauded the change, noting that the agency changing its definition was the same one that said last year it would yank CBD products off shelves.

That crackdown was put on hold pending a legal review.

Continue reading “Texas loosens state-level hemp ban, but uncertainty remains”

The latest prospects for marijuana reform in Texas: Both major parties pushing for changes at Capitol

mjc

Lawmakers have filed 13 bills related to marijuana policy so far this session, with Gov. Greg Abbott signaling he is on board with reducing penalties for possession of small amounts of pot.

Many states have approved the use of marijuana for both medical and recreational purposes. To date, the only major piece of legislation in Texas is the use of low-THC oil for children suffering from intractable epilepsy.

The Texas Department of Public Safety has approved 40 doctors from three clinics for the prescription of low-THC cannabis. The three companies providing low-THC cannabis in Texas are Cansortium Texas, based in Schulenberg; Compassionate Cultivation in Manchaca, just south of Austin; and Surterra Wellness in Austin.

Continue reading “The latest prospects for marijuana reform in Texas: Both major parties pushing for changes at Capitol”

Marijuana and CBD Laws in Texas Podcast

Shawn McDonald of Smith McDonald Bolin explains what the current Texas laws are related to Marijuana possession and CBD oils.

He also explains how different counties are “enforcing” the law. For more information about or to ask questions related to these laws, please leave a comment below and we’ll be sure to answer them.